How strong glutes can help strengthen your core and improve pelvic floor

 

“Oh, my God, Becky–look at her butt. It is like so big. She must have a functional pelvic floor.”

That’s how I’d remix that classic Sir Mixalot song now that I’m obsessed with helping women get fit in a healthy whole body way.

Have you noticed I often post exercises that target your core AND your glute muscles? Like this one, this, or this. Your glutes are so epically important to improve pelvic floor function and help rehabilitate a diastasis recti–an abdominal separation common after pregnancy.

Katy Bowman of Nutritious Movement said it best
“The gluteal muscles (your butt!) keep the pelvic floor in check, preventing the sacrum from collapsing and provide leverage for the pelvic floor to contract. The secret to perfect pelvic floor tone is supple and strong glutes and pelvic floor muscles — not one stronger than the other.”

“The gluteal muscles (your butt!) keep the pelvic floor in check, preventing the sacrum from collapsing and provide leverage for the pelvic floor to contract. The secret to perfect pelvic floor tone is supple and strong glutes and pelvic floor muscles — not one stronger than the other.”

What does this mean? It means you can kegel until the cows come home, but you are still going to piss your pants when you do double unders unless you learn how to recruit your inner most abdominal muscles–the transverse abdomens–and your glutes in coordination! You have to learn how to use your breath.  And have good form–check out his video on squatting while using your breath to cue your abdominal muscles.

Here’s the other kicker, if you aren’t activating your glute muscles properly, you are compensating in other areas. Hello worsening diastasis recti and low back pain. The body is smart.  It will “muscle through” difficult movement, but you will pay a price.

Learn to recruit those glutes in coordination with your deep abdominal muscles and pelvic floor and not only will you look sexy in a pair of jeans…but you’ll also have better core and pelvic floor function. Can I get WOO-HOO!

Next week I will posting an article entitled:

You don’t have to piss your pants when you sneeze—and other fun facts your pelvic floor physical therapist wants you to know before, during and after pregnancy.

This should answer quite a few questions for those of you suffering from “side effects” from pregnancy.

For now, check out this gluts-activating series.


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